Mittens Ornament Free Crochet Pattern

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Mittens Ornament Free Crochet Pattern

Hi, all! I’m back with another crochet ornament pattern!

I mentioned in the post for the Snowman Ornament, that I like to crochet ornaments to give to friends at Christmas each year. I usually crochet several of the same ornament to gift, but this year I decided to branch out and design a few different ones to gift.

In this post, I’ll be giving you all the details you need to make a pair of these crocheted mittens! These would be so sweet to add to any decor but I can particularly imagine them hanging on a tree with a rustic theme, among little woodland animals and skates and wooden ornaments. Of course, since the customization possibilities are absolutely endless, you could make them to suit any decor or theme at all!

I’ve opted to make a couple of different versions, including little kawaii mittens (because I can’t resist putting cute faces on all the things!). The first pair I made were the grey ones with the pink snowflake pattern. They turned out a bit chubbier than expected, so I tweaked the pattern a little and then made the pink fair-isle (kawaii) pair. Unfortunately, there just wasn’t enough contrast between the pink and the white yarn in this pair and you can barely see the fair-isle pattern in the photos. In any event, I’ve included the patterns for both the snowflake and the fair-isle mittens in this post, but you could easily makes these in all one solid colour as well! I’ve included the pattern for a solid colour mitten below, to make it easier to read the stitch counts without all the colour changes. Scroll down to the instructions for the back panel of the snowflake mitten for that.

As usual, this pattern is made in the same style as our Ragdoll patterns; separate pieces worked in flat rows and then joined together. Each mitten has two pieces and, as mentioned, there is some optional colour-work involved as well.

The grey and pink mittens measure approximately 7.5cm/3″ from top to bottom. I used a 2.25mm hook and light weight yarn to obtain this size. However, I also wanted to try making an even smaller version so, using the same pattern, I used a 1.5mm hook and super fine yarn (Lion Brand Woolike) to make the little red and white snowflake mitten, which measures approximately 5cm/2″from top to bottom. The last picture before the assembly section shows the difference in size between the regular ones and the little red mitten.

Let’s get started (or Pin it for later here!) Here’s what I used:

**If you’d prefer a downloadable or printable version of this pattern, an inexpensive, formatted, and ad-free PDF can be purchased HERE.**

  • For the Grey Mittens:
    • 2.25mm hook (I use THESE hooks!);
    • Fine weight or Light weight yarn in grey and pink (I used a generic acrylic yarn from a local store, which is, unfortunately, not widely available);
  • For the Pink Kawaii Mittens:
    • 2.25mm hook;
    • Fine weight or Light weight yarn in pink and white;
    • Black crochet thread for mouth/eyes;
    • 8mm Safety Eyes;
  • For the Red Mitten:
    • 1.5mm hook;
    • Lion Brand Woolike in Red (super fine);
    • Lion Brand Woolike in White (super fine);
  • Tapestry needle;

Reading this Pattern and Colour Changes:

Everything is worked in single crochet stitches, except for row 21 where the stitches are specified. So, in order to indicate the colour-changes, I have omitted the usual “sc” in front of the stitch counts in any lines with colour-changes and I’ve used the associated colour letter instead. For example, “Pdec” means to work a sc decrease in pink yarn. “P3, W1” means to work the next 3 sc in pink and the next 1 sc in white, and so on.

Due to the colour-changes, you may want to have at least two balls of yarn attached to your project at once by taking one skein of yarn and separating it into several smaller balls. This cuts down significantly on having to carry your yarn. For example, you could use one white ball for each side of the fair-isle mittens, rather than having to carry the white across the back after every other row (regretfully, I didn’t do this and it was definitely a bit tangly).

The bonus part of the colour-changes in an amigurumi is that you don’t have to worry about what the back of your panels look like! This is why I carry my yarn on the back instead of carrying it inside the stitch as you go. It prevents any colours from bleeding through where they shouldn’t. As long as you always carry your yarn on the back of your panel, you won’t have to weave in any ends and you’ll have a beautiful smooth front with clear lines and colours.

When changing colours, you will insert your hook into the stitch for the last stitch of Colour A and pull up a loop. Then, with Colour B, yarn over and complete the stitch by pulling through both loops with Colour B. Drop your working yarn in Colour A and continue with Colour B. You will pick your Colour A working yarn back up again on the way back in the next row when you need it.

*Make sure to always drop your yarn on the WRONG side of your panel!* So, for example, when you are working on a row where the wrong side of the panel is facing you, you will have to make a conscious effort to pull your yarn toward you to the wrong side of the panel when dropping your yarn during a colour-change. This is because it will naturally drop to the side furthest away from you if you don’t. It doesn’t matter which side you choose as your “right” or “wrong” side, since the stitches look the same (unlike when working in the round), just as long as you’re consistent in carrying your yarn!

Colour Legend:

W – White

P – Pink

G – Grey

Pink Fairisle Kawaii Mitten (make 4 panels) starting in Pink:

*Ch 1 and turn at the end of each row. The first four rows are worked entirely in pink.*

Row 1: Ch 12, sc across (11 sts)

Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as st), bpdc, fpdc across (11 sts)

*The last fpdc will not be worked around a post, since it’s the last st of the row. Simply insert your hook from the front and complete a dc like normal.*

Row 3: Ch 2 (does not count as st), fpdc, bpdc across (11 sts)

*This row should line up such that the fpdc sts are worked over the bpdc of the previous row, creating a uniform ridge.*

Row 4: Sc across (11 sts)

Now we will start incorporating the white.

Row 5: Pinc, P1, W1, P3, W1, P3, [W1, P1] in last st (13 sts)

Row 6: P13 (13 sts)

Row 7: Pinc, W1, P3, W1, P3, W1, P2, [P1, W1] in last st (15 sts)

Row 8: P15 (15 sts)

Row 9: W1, P3, W1, P3, W1, P3, W1, P2 (15 sts)

Row 10: P15 (15 sts)

Row 11: P2, [W1, P3] three times, W1 in last st (15 sts)

Row 12: P15 (15 sts)

Row 13: [W1, P3] three times, W1, P2 (15 sts)

Row 14: P15 (15 sts)

Row 15: P2, [W1, P3] three times, W1 in last st (15 sts)

Row 16: P15 (15 sts)

Row 17: [W1, P3] three times, W1, P2 (15 sts)

Row 18: Pdec, P11, Pdec (13 sts)

Row 19: Wdec, P3, W1, P3, W1, P1, Pdec (11 sts)

Row 20: Pdec, P7, Pdec (9 sts)

Row 21: Wdec, P1, Phdc 2, Whdc, P1, Pdec (7 sts)

Tie off. Repeat rows 1-21 for the back panel and then make 2 more panels for the second mitten and set aside for assembly later.

Thumb:

The thumb section will be crocheted directly onto your panels, so you will need to join your yarn to the panel in the first row after the ribbing rows, as seen below. Keep in mind that, on two panels, you will need to attach the thumb with the right side of the panel facing you, and on the other two panels, you will need to join the thumb with the wrong side of the panel facing you. This ensures the mitten panels all match up and all the ends are on the inside.

Row 1: Sc 6 along the edge of the panel (6 sts)

Row 2: Inc, sc 3, dec (6 sts)

Row 3: Dec, sc 3, inc (6 sts)

Row 4: Inc, sc 3, dec (6 sts)

Row 5: Dec, sc 3, inc (6 sts)

Row 6: Dec, hdc 2, dec (4 sts)

Tie off. Repeat for remaining panels.

Snowflake Mitten Front Panel (make 2 for a pair) starting in main colour (in my case, grey):

Row 1: Ch 12, sc across (11 sts)

Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as st), bpdc, fpdc across (11 sts)

*Remember, the last fpdc will not be worked around a post, since it’s the last st of the row. Simply insert your hook from the front and work a dc as normal.*

Row 3: Ch 2 (does not count as st), fpdc, bpdc across (11 sts)

*The fpdcs and bpdcs should line up with the previous row to create uniform ridges.*

Row 4: Sc across (11 sts)

Row 5: Inc, sc 9, inc (13 sts)

Row 6: Sc across (13 sts)

Now we will start incorporating the colour-work for the snowflake pattern.

Row 7: Ginc, G2, P1, G5, P1, G2, Ginc (15 sts)

Row 8: G4, P2, G3, P2, G4 (15 sts)

Row 9: G4, P3, G1, P3, G4 (15 sts)

Row 10: G1, P3, G1, P2, G1, P2, G1, P3, G1 (15 sts)

Row 11: G2, P3, G1, P1, G1, P1, G1, P3, G2 (15 sts)

Row 12: G3, P3, G1, P1, G1, P3, G3 (15 sts)

Row 13: G6, P3, G6 (15 sts)

Row 14: G3, P3, G1, P1, G1, P3, G3 (15 sts)

Row 15: G2, P3, G1, P1, G1, P1, G1, P3, G2 (15 sts)

Row 16: G1, P3, G1, P2, G1, P2, G1, P3, G1 (15 sts)

Row 17: G4, P3, G1, P3, G4 (15 sts)

Row 18: Gdec, G2, P2, G3, P2, G2, Gdec (13 sts)

Row 19: Gdec, G1, P1, G5, P1, G1, Gdec (11 sts)

The last two rows are worked entirely in the main colour.

Row 20: Dec, sc 7, dec (9 sts)

Row 21: Dec, sc, hdc 3, sc, dec (7 sts)

Tie off. Repeat for the other front panel.

Snowflake Mitten Back Panel (or Solid Colour Mittens) (make 2 for a pair of snowflake mittens or 4 for a pair of solid-colour mittens):

I chose to make the back panel of the snowflake mittens one solid colour (i.e. no pattern on the back) but, if you want, you could make four panels with the snowflake pattern and make them reversible, so to speak. If you want to make the back panel just one solid colour like I did, or want to make your entire mitten in one solid colour, here are the details (the stitch counts are exactly the same as the front panel above, just easier to read):

Row 1: Ch 12, sc across (11 sts)

Row 2: Ch 2 (does not count as st), bpdc, fpdc across (11 sts)

Row 3: Ch 2 (does not count as st), fpdc, bpdc across (11 sts)

Row 4: Sc across (11 sts)

Row 5: Inc, sc 9, inc (13 sts)

Row 6: Sc across (13 sts)

Row 7: Inc, sc 11, inc (15 sts)

Rows 8-17: Sc across (15 sts)

Row 18: Dec, sc 11, dec (13 sts)

Row 19: Dec, sc 9, dec (11 sts)

Row 20: Dec, sc 7, dec (9 sts)

Row 21: Dec, sc, hdc 3, sc, dec (7 sts)

Tie off. Repeat for the other back panel.

Now, crochet the thumbs onto the panels of the mittens as explained in the “Thumb” section above. Move on to assembly below.

Assembly:

Step 1: Eyes and Mouth

First, if you would like to add a happy little kawaii face to your mittens,  attach the eyes and stitch on the mouth using black crochet thread onto the front panel now.

Step 2: Main Mitten

Okay, here are all the pieces you should now have at this step. I already had one mitten completed when I took these photos.

Place the two panels together, matching up all sides.

Make sure the front of your Mittens are facing you as you crochet around the outside of each one. Additionally, I opted to put the faces on the same side of each mitten for the pink pair (i.e. the thumbs are both pointing left), but, for the snowflake patterned ones, I made sure the front of each mitten was opposite from the other (i.e. I made it so that, when looking at the front of the mittens, the thumbs are facing inward on both, just like a real pair of mittens). Choose whichever way strikes your fancy!

Starting in the corner of the cuff, as shown above, begin attaching the panels together by chaining one and single crocheting around the outside of the panels.

Crochet up the side of the mitten, around the thumb and back down to the other side. Tie off, leaving the bottom open. Cut any yarn tails that are peeking out the bottom and/or push them back inside.

Repeat for the second mitten but do not tie off yet. Chain 25 and then slst to the first mitten you finished. Voila! Mittens on a string! This is how you will hang your mittens on the tree. If you are making just one mitten, simply chain 25 and slst the chains back to the starting stitch on the same mitten. Now you have a loop to hang it with.

You’re done!

 

 

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8 thoughts on “Mittens Ornament Free Crochet Pattern

  1. These are so darned cute. You have solved an old lady’s problem. I didn’t have time to do what I wanted as all of my supplies are in storage…thank you, thank you, thank you!

  2. Hi, these mini mittens are super cute! I really would like to make these but I’m not very familiar with the bpdc and fpdc yet. I found instructions and understand it but I’m not sure how to start them in the sc’s of row 1.
    Could you help me out? Thank you.

    1. Hi Irene,

      No problem, I’ll try to clarify!

      Essentially, you are working the stitch around the post of the sc, instead of through the “v” of the sc. So, for a bpdc, you will yarn over, insert your hook into the first st but insert it from the back of the panel, then insert the hook out through the next st, then yarn over and complete the dc as usual.

      Next, you will work a fpdc around the next post, so you will yarn over, insert your hook into the previous st that your hook was just in, but this time insert it from the front, then around the post and back through the next stitch and complete the dc as usual.

      I hope that helps a bit! Please let me know if you’re still unsure.

      1. Hi Jillian,

        Thanks for the explanation. I understand how the stitch itself works. But I’m not sure what the post of a sc is. All the tutorials I found show a bpdc or fpdc based on a row of dc’s. With a dc it’s clear what part of the stitch is the post.
        I tried it at the very base of the row but it looked a bit wonky after finishing row 2. Maybe I did it the right but I couldn’t say with certainty. Too bad I can’t add a photo to show it, would be much easier to explain. Haha.

        1. Sounds like you’re doing it right! As long as you’re inserting your hook through one stitch and out the other, you will be working around the post. The post in a sc is just shorter than for a dc. 🙂

          1. Thank you Jillian. I think I’m on the right track.
            I hope it turns out as cool as yours. And keep up the awesome patterns.

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